CPJ Blog

Press Freedom News and Views

USA

Blog   |   USA

CPJ mourns the passing of Richard Holbrooke

Holbrooke with his wife, the author Kati Marton, at CPJ's International Press Freedom Awards in November. (Getty Images for CPJ/Michael Nagle)

Richard C. Holbrooke, "one of the giants of American foreign policy" in President Barack Obama's words, was also an ally of press freedom and a good friend to CPJ. In a statement marking Holbrooke's death at age 69, Chairman Paul E. Steiger said: "CPJ mourns the passing of Ambassador Richard C. Holbrooke. He was a champion of human rights and a great friend to press freedom. Our thoughts are with his family, especially his widow, CPJ board member and former chair, Kati Marton." 

December 14, 2010 2:15 PM ET

Tags:

Blog   |   Internet, Thailand, UK, USA, Venezuela

Internet Blotter

December 1, 2010 4:51 PM ET

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Blog   |   Egypt, Internet, Iran, Saudi Arabia, Sweden, USA

Internet Blotter

  • Egyptian blogger Karim Amer is finally free after four years in prison.
  • Iran launches yet another police force to deal with the Internet, headquartered with the Revolutionary Guard. Its commander says the state plans to quadruple its Internet control budget.
  • Google lobbies U.S. policymakers to consider online censorship a free trade issue.
  • Is breaking into Yahoo e-mail too easy? The Sarah Palin hack revealed flaws in the webmail system's security that can still be exploited.
  • Yet more malicious attacks on computers connected to the Nobel Peace Prize. As with CPJ and other groups, the Nobel Institute's director, Geir Lundestad, received a personalized, but fake e-mail containing malware.
  • Saudi Arabia blocks Facebook over "moral concerns"--then immediately unblocks it, claiming an "error."
November 16, 2010 5:07 PM ET

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Blog   |   Ethiopia, USA

In exile in the U.S., Ethiopian journalist struggles forward

After almost a year in exile in America, an icy ocean away from his home in Ethiopia, journalist Samson Mekonnen, left, only recently received his work permit in Washington. In the interim, like most journalists undergoing the emotionally and financially grueling resettlement process, he has relied on friends, family, and international organizations like CPJ to support himself and his family while his petition for asylum navigates the bureaucratic waters.  

November 12, 2010 2:09 PM ET

Tags:

Blog   |   Iran, Security, USA

Press Club honors jailed Iranian Kouhyar Goudarzi

Goudarzi

The
National Press Club next week will honor an Iranian journalist who is languishing in prison. Kouhyar Goudarzi, an online reporter and human rights activist, was
pursuing an aerospace degree at Sharif Industrial University when security agents put him behind bars, according to the International
Campaign for Human Rights in Iran
. Goudarzi, left, was an editor for Iran's Committee
of Human Rights Reporters and a producer for Radio Zamaneh.


Blog   |   Mexico, USA

Brad Will's mother: 'No movement' in case four years on

AP

Last week marked the fourth anniversary of the murder of Brad Will, a 36-year-old American activist and journalist who was shot while covering anti-government protests in the southern Mexican state of Oaxaca. His murderers remain at large. 

November 5, 2010 10:47 AM ET

Tags:

Blog   |   Bahrain, Internet, Iran, Thailand, USA

Internet blotter

October 20, 2010 4:58 PM ET

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Blog   |   Canada, Iran, USA

Derakhshan case: When keeping quiet does not work

Creative Commons

The severity of the nearly 20-year jail sentence handed down to veteran Iranian blogger Hossein Derakhshan, left, has shocked many exiled Iranian journalists and bloggers with whom I've spoken. It's also reinforced their belief that the best way to help jailed colleagues is not through quiet diplomacy but by making a lot of noise.

October 5, 2010 2:56 PM ET

Tags:

Blog   |   Security, USA

In U.S., dangerous misconceptions from TSA poster

Back in 2004, Iraqi gunmen loyal to the radical Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr abducted U.S. freelance photographer Paul Taggert because, as they later told The Associated Press, they thought he was a spy. Now, a new poster from the U.S. Transportation Security Administration reinforces dangerous misconceptions by depicting a photographer as a terrorist.

October 1, 2010 10:11 AM ET

Tags:

Blog   |   Internet, USA

U.S. proposals undermine secure, uncensored Internet

UPDATE, OCTOBER 22, 2010: CPJ's board of directors sets policy for the organization. At the October 18 meeting of the board, directors discussed the Combating Online Infringement and Counterfeits Act, known as COICA.

The September 30 blog post below incorrectly stated that CPJ had "joined with other press freedom and civil liberty organizations and the Internet's pioneering engineers to urge the U.S. Senate to reject COICA in its current form." After discussion, the board determined that CPJ should take no position on the proposed legislation at this time. The matter was referred to the CPJ policy committee for further review.

A bill sponsored by Sens. Hatch, left, and Leahy could damage a free Internet. (AP file)

2010

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