Africa

2010

Blog   |   Tanzania

Government threatens press in pre-election Tanzania

Incumbent Tanzanian President Jakaya Kiketwe during rally in September. (AP)

As the October 31 national elections draw near, Tanzania's media is in a frenzy trying to cover the close race between the two leading presidential candidates. But government threats and draconian media laws may be getting in the way of objective coverage.

Blog   |   Internet

Protecting journalists from Firesheep

Wifi users at a McDonald's in Manhattan. (AP/Bebeto Matthews)

There's been a great deal of coverage in the last day or so of Firesheep, a plugin for Firefox that lets you take over the Facebook and Twitter accounts of others on your local network. If you use Firesheep, you can pick one of the people on, say, the same open wireless at your nearby cafe, and then easily view, delete, and add comments using their name on these sites.

October 26, 2010 9:34 AM ET

Tags:

Blog   |   South Africa

In South Africa, echoes of Black Wednesday

South African journalists protest media restrictions on the nation's annual Day of Media Freedom. (Independent Newspapers Cape)

On October 19, 1977, South Africa's government banned The World newspaper, along with Weekend World, the paper's weekly magazine, and Pro Veritate, a Christian publication. Authorities also detained scores of activists and outlawed 17 anti-apartheid groups during the one-day crackdown, which came to be known as Black Wednesday.

Alerts   |   Swaziland

Swaziland prime minister threatens to censor columnists

New York, October 22, 2010--The Committee to Protect Journalists is alarmed by a recent statement from Swaziland's Prime Minister, Barnabas Sibusiso Dlamini, announcing his intention to create a law requiring newspaper columnists to seek permission before they write critically about the government.

Alerts   |   Angola

In Angola, radio commentator injured in stabbing

New York, October 22, 2010--A popular Angolan radio commentator, whose satirical broadcasts have been critical of the government, was injured in a stabbing this morning in the capital city of Luanda, according to local journalists and news reports.
October 22, 2010 1:26 PM ET

Tags:

Blog   |   South Africa

South Africa weighs dropping media tribunal plan

Deputy President Kgalema Motlanthe addresses reporters. (AFP)

For the first time in South Africa's months-long debate over the proposal for a government-run media appeals tribunal, a top official from the African National Congress (ANC) indicated on Friday that the plan could be dropped altogether--under certain conditions.

Blog   |   CPJ, Equatorial Guinea

Obiang prize suspended indefinitely

The Obiang prize, named for and funded by one of Africa's most notorious dictators, was a very poor idea from the start and our goal, bluntly, was to kill it. We didn't quite succeed in getting an outright cancellation, but the prize, while technically alive, is in a deep coma with virtually no chance of recovery. How the prize came to a halt is detailed in a press release available on the website of the Open Society Institute's Justice Initiative, but here's the story in a nutshell.

October 21, 2010 12:55 PM ET

Tags:

Alerts   |   Somalia

Attackers lob grenade at Puntland radio station

A grenade blew through the roof of Horseed FM's office in Bossasso. (Horseed FM)

New York, October 19, 2010--A pair of assailants lobbed a grenade Monday evening at Horseed FM, a private radio station broadcasting from the port city of Bossasso, the economic capital of Somalia's semi-autonomous Puntland region, according to local reports. After the grenade exploded, one of the attackers began shooting at an adjacent café, Horseed Managing Director Mahad M. Ahmed told CPJ.

Blog   |   Rwanda

Censored in Rwanda, editors work from exile

The editors of Rwanda's once-leading newspaper now publish from exile. (CPJ)
Though it has been a dark year for Rwanda's press, it has also been a year of resistance and turning to a new sort of reporting--from exile.

Ever since Rwandan authorities began cracking down on the nation's independent press before the presidential elections in August, the space for critical reporting has been dissipating.

Blog   |   Gabon

In Gabon, censorship lingers from 2009 vote

Gabonese journalists at Radio TV Top Bendje, whose transmitters were disconnected during the 2009 elections. (Radio TV Top Bendje)

In Gabon, more than a year after the historic and contested presidential elections won by Ali Ben Bongo Ondimba, the main radio and television stations of Ondimba's two main opponents still face administrative obstructions imposed during the polls, according to interviews CPJ conducted with journalists and officials between July and September.

2010

Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 or all
« Previous Page   Next Page »
« 2009 | 2011 »